Borg vs McEnroe

Running time: 100 mins
Release Date: 22nd September 2017
Certificate: 15
Director: Janus Metz
Cast: Sverrir Gudnason, Shia LaBeouf, Stellan Skarsgard, Tuva Novotny, David Bamber, Ian Blackman, Robert Emms, Leo Borg


Synopsis:
It’s the summer of 1980 and Björn Borg (Sverrir Gudnason) is the top tennis player in the world. A powerful and rigorously disciplined player, there is only one obstacle in his pursuit of a record-breaking fifth Wimbledon championship: the highly talented but ferociously abrasive young American, John McEnroe (Shia LaBeouf). With three days until the tournament begins, Borg trains religiously in his lavish Monaco home, aided by his coach and mentor Lennart (Stellan Skarsgård) and girlfriend Mariana (Tuva Novotny). But McEnroe’s explosive confidence and wrecking-ball persona continue to infiltrate Borg’s ice-cool and normally unshakable temperament. With each man the antithesis of the other, both players delve into their formative memories as the climactic tournament draws near and anticipation reaches fever pitch. Visceral and breathlessly tense, the match itself – regarded as one of the greatest of all time – would mark the pinnacle of the ‘Fire and Ice’ rivalry between them.


My first introduction to tennis was at primary school. It was all down to my childhood school friend, Caroline who developed a fascination for Björn Borg. She spent every spare moment, drawing Borg and cartoon strips of John McEnroe, with “You cannot be serious!” speech bubbles, eventually drawing her crush vs his rival into a cartoon complete with headbands.

By the time I finally watched tennis on television, Borg was no longer playing professionally, but McEnroe was still throwing his tennis rackets, I wanted to see what  Caroline’s kiddie crush was all about.

 

The title Borg Vs McEnroe instantly reminds me of those summer days of 1979 and 1980, and the film takes us back to that time, with the great, almost uncanny lookalike casting of Gudnason, and to a lesser degree, LaBeouf. As Borg prepares for his fifth attempt at the Wimbledon championship, we see flashbacks to his childhood (played by Borg’s son, Leo Borg), and highlights of his journey to professional player. These flashbacks give an insight into the inscrutable ‘IceBorg’ character that I never knew about and adds depth to the rivalry between Borg and McEnroe. McEnroe also has flashbacks to his childhood, and again, there are examples of his intelligence, drive and ‘SpoiltBrat’ nickname. I found these insights to their characters fascinating. The same flashbacks were repeated through the film, and I felt they were over-used – we didn’t need to see the same clips over to get the message.

Another challenge the film had was to make tennis look exciting on film. I had a little help with feeling nervous, as I hadn’t checked and didn’t remember the actual outcome of the 1980 championship. I was tense, I didn’t know what would happen next. If I’d known the outcome or how the match played out, I might not have found it so interesting! The film finds the right balance to keep it interesting enough for me.

The claimed rivalry doesn’t really come across on screen, infact, in some way, you get the impression that the players admired each other – this makes it a nicer film, touching. You get a sense of how intense match preparation is, and it offers insight into the off-court pressures and tensions of all tennis players.

I’m not a big tennis fan, I’ll watch a game if I catch it on, but I don’t currently follow the players, and I still enjoyed this film, loved what I learnt, and came away with a good feeling from Borg vs McEnroe.

Borg Vs McEnroe website

#BorgMcEnroe

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Mindhorn

Running time: 89 mins
Release Date: 5th May 2017
Certificate: 15
Director: Sean Foley
Cast: Julian Barratt, Russell Tovey, Andrea Riseborough, Essie Davis, Harriet Walter


Synopsis:
Washed-up Richard Thorncroft (Julian Barratt) peaked with hit 1980s detective show Mindhorn, playing the titular Isle of Man sleuth with a robotic eye that allowed him to literally “see the truth”. Decades later, when a deranged Manx criminal demands Mindhorn as his nemesis, Thorncroft returns to the scene of his greatest triumphs for one last chance to reignite his glory days, professional credibility and even romance with former co-star/paramour Patricia Deville (Essie Davis).


What the hell? That was my first thought! But this crime-comedy-whodunit grew and grew on me! Deffo go and see this one, it is so bad, it’s good. Cheese upon cheese, with great performances from all, all set on the Isle of Man.

Sense of an Ending

Running time: 108 mins
Release Date: 14th April 2017
Certificate: 15
Director: Ritesh Batra
Cast: Jim Broadbent, Charlotte Rampling, Harriet Walter, Michelle Dockery, Emily Mortimer


Synopsis:
Based on the Man Booker-winning novel by Julian Barnes. Tony Webster (Broadbent) leads a reclusive and quiet existence until long buried secrets from his past force him to face the flawed recollections of his younger self, the truth about his first love (Rampling) and the devastating consequences of decisions made a lifetime ago.


I haven’t read the book, but the trailer looked fascinating. Great performances from the cast, but the film was lacking a certain ‘umpf’ – not enough suspense and tension, and the conclusion of the story didn’t feel like the big reveal that the film had tried to build up to. It’s okay, not enough excitement for me.

The Lost City Of Z

Running time: 140 mins
Release Date: 24th March 2017
Certificate: 15
Director: James Gray
Cast: Tom Holland, Charlie Hunnam, Sienna Miller, Robert Pattinson


Synopsis:
Based on author David Grann’s nonfiction bestseller, THE LOST CITY OF Z tells the incredible true story of British explorer Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam), who journeys into the Amazon at the dawn of the 20th century and discovers evidence of a previously unknown, advanced civilization that may have once inhabited the region. Despite being ridiculed by the scientific establishment who regard indigenous populations as “savages”, the determined Fawcett – supported by his devoted wife (Sienna Miller), son (Tom Holland) and aide de camp (Robert Pattinson) – returns time and again to his beloved jungle in an attempt to prove his case, culminating in his mysterious disappearance in 1925.


I shall display my ignorance and say that I had never heard of Percy Fawcett, or his expeditions, so it was interesting to learn about these. I really enjoyed the opening of the film, getting his background, and things that led to the first expedition, but once the expeditions started, the film seemed to slow down. I suppose I would have liked more excitement, but the story is based on truth, so if this is an area of interest to you, you may well find it fascinating. It does leave you with a wonder at the fate of Fawcett, and has a lovely and whimsical Magical Realism ending.

Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam)

Another Mother’s Son

Running time: 98 mins
Release Date: 24th March 2017
Certificate: 12A
Director: Christopher Menaul
Cast: Jenny Seagrove, John Hannah, Julian Kostov, Ronan Keating


Synopsis:
Set during World War II, when the island of Jersey was occupied by the Nazis, and based on the true story of Louisa Gould, who took in an escaped Russian POW and hid him over the course of the war. Amid growing tension it became clear that British wartime leader Winston Churchill would not risk an assault to re-capture the occupied island, the community began to fray under the pressures of hunger, occupation and divided loyalty. Against this backdrop, Lou fights to preserve her family’s sense of humanity and to protect
the Russian boy as if he were her own.


A truly interesting WWII story about everyday people putting their life in danger to save a person, ‘Another Mother’s Son’. Jenny Seagrove plays a headstrong and heart happy Gould, who went about it with a breath-taking boldness that defies belief. Seagrove’s accent distracted me on occasion – I don’t know the Jersey accent, so it may be more that it didn’t seem right coming from her? I’m not sure. It was a pleasant surprise seeing Ronan Keating acting, and of course he gets a bot of singing in! John Hannah, in the role of is also excellent. It’s a story of courage, blind trust and touch of naivety with unexpected tragedy.

“Return to D’Ennery; Rain” by Derek Walcott

Last Year's Almanac

Imprisoned in these wires of rain, I watch
This village stricken with a single street,
Each weathered shack leans on a wooden crutch,
Contented as a cripple with defeat.
Five years ago even poverty seemed sweet,
So azure and indifferent was this air,
So murmurous of oblivion the sea,
That any human action seemed a waste,
The place seemed born for being buried there.

The surf explodes

In scissor-birds hunting the usual fish,
The rain is muddying unpaved inland roads,
So personal grief melts the general wish.

The hospital is quiet in the rain.
A naked boy drives pigs into the bush.
The coast shudders with every surge. The beach
Admits a beaten heron. Filth and foam.
There in a belt of emerald light, a sail
Plunges and lifts between the crests of reef,
The hills are smoking in the vaporous light,
The rain seeps slowly to the core of…

View original post 239 more words

BFI Flare Film Festival 2017

BFI Flare Film Festival is back for 2017. Opening with, Against The Law on Thursday 16th March. Our selection of films to look out for are listed below, and include Oscar winning Moonlight, hotly debated in our Oggscars recording. Set in Miami, the film follows Chiron from childhood to adulthood. Beautifully portrayed, it is a must see.

Also at the festival catch the new UK web series, Different For Girls, a smart, sassy, sexy multi-layered lesbian drama, directed by award-winning Festival alumni Campbell X.

Danny Glover appears in San Francisco-set black comedy, Pushing Dead, as boss to Dan, who is facing losing his HIV drugs after 20 years of keeping it at bay.

Uganda is back in the spotlight at the festival with, The Pearl of Africa. This unified six-part web-series follows Uganda’s first out transgender woman, Cleopatra Kambugu from home to Kenya and then Thailand.

We managed to see Jewel’s Catch One at the 60th London Film Festival. It is a celebration of Jewel Thais Williams, owner of the legendary Catch One bar – one of Los Angeles first gay venues. Covering Jewel’s journey from purchasing the bar, fighting through discrimination, and personal challenges. Jewel managed to create a disco bar that welcomed every one, including stars like Madonna.

Plus Brazillian film, Waiting for B, a kitschy, light-hearted and thoroughly camp portrayal of pop culture, mega fandom and the adoration of Beyoncé.

The festival runs for 11 days, and closes on the 26th March with a gala screening of, Signature Move.

Jammie & EC Forde


16-26 March 2017
Over 50 features, more than 100 shorts and a wide range of special events, guest appearances, discussions, workshops, club nights and much more.
BFI Southbank.

Download the film Schedule here.

The official BFI Flare trailer



FEATURE FILMS


Different for Girls | Fri17
A smart, sexy new lesbian drama web series from the award-winning director Campbell X.

Waiting for B | Fri 17 / Sat 18
A crew of queer young Brazilian camp out two months in advance of Beyonce’s big show. One for superfans of the beyhive.

Moonlight | Fri 17/ Sat 18 / Sat 25
The Oscar winning, much-anticipated feature in which a young boy growing up in a harsh environment learns what it means to love and be loved.

Jewel’s Catch One | Fri 17 / Sat 19
This is the story of how Jewel rose from humble origins to create one of the most inclusive, radical and star-studded LGBT discos in America.

The Pearl of Africa | Sun 19 / Mon 20 / Fri 24
After suffering persecution from Uganda’s government and media, Cleopatra journeys to Thailand to get surgery and finally live freely with her boyfriend Nelson.

Free CeCe! | Tue 21 / Wed 22
Laverne Cox leads this insightful documentary into the case of Cece McDonald, whose infamous case sparked protests around the world.

Can’t Stop the Music | Thur 23 [BFI IMAX, Waterloo]
A monument to camp with the Village People and some of the most dazzling musical numbers ever committed to celluloid.

Being 17 (Quand On A 17 Ans) | Thur 23 / Fri 24
Set in the French Alps, this beautiful and emotional coming of age tale has two boys in their last year at school coming to terms with their emotions.

Body Electric (Corpo Elétrico) | Thur 23/ Sat 25
A lively Brazilian drama set in a garment factory: young manager Elias finds distraction in some of his fellow workers, but is he getting too close?

The Trans List | Thu 23 / Sun 26
Famous faces abound in this new HBO production from Timothy Greenfield-Sanders celebrating trans luminaries.

Sexit Screenings: Enactone + Snapshot | Fri 24
As part of the Sexit programme, a double bill featuring two new porn films that will challenge as much as arouse.

Pushing Dead | Sat 25 / Sun 26
Delightful comedy set in San Francisco, in which an HIV-positive slacker/writer battles with life, meds and friends.

Pride? | Sat 25 / Sun 26
A warm and intelligent survey that examines the history of Pride, its radical off-shoots, like Black Pride, and what the future of queer organising will be.


Short Films


Sat 18 / Sun 19 | Transcendent Tales Bold and beautiful fictional shorts from first inklings to years after transition.

Diane From the Moon
Mya Taylor plays a pagan priestess who takes no prisoners.


 

Sun 19 / Wed 22 | Shadow and Act Stylish shorts that compel you to know yourself, live freely and speak the truth to power.

Reluctantly Queer
A beautiful letter about migration, identity and love from a young Ghanaian man to his family.

Hattie Goes Cruising
An ageing African-American couple give a how-to on cruising and what it was like being young, queer and pretty in 1970s and 1980s New York.

Still Burning
A young migrant from Guadeloupe on the French vogue scene cares for his younger brother who is getting ready for his first ball.
*Watch Free on #BFIPlayer or YouTube as part of #FiveFilms4Freedom

I am a Woman
The politics of gender, identity and race are explored in this short and energetic spoken word piece.

Bayard and Me
Civil rights activist Bayard Rustin, the organisational genius behind the 1963 March on Washington, is remembered by his younger partner.

Our Skin
When a sexy chat becomes an intense exchange on race, politics and war, two strangers find out how much they can accept in each other and in themselves.


Thur 23 | The Permanent Perception The queer experience, both real and imagined. A collection of experimental short films, showcasing the best in contemporary artists’ film and video.

Generation Divide
LGBT histories through a TV sitcom lens.

Generation Divide II
More politics and canned laughter.


Sat 25 / Sun 26 | Falling Free An inspiring and varied collection of queer tales, showcasing our most exciting home-grown filmmaking talent.

We Love Moses
Twelve-year-old Ella discovers a secret about her brother’s best mate.


Sat 25 / Sun 26 | Trials and Liberations – Personal stories of transgender and non-binary experiences from around the globe.

Places of Fear and hatred (Lugares de Medo e Ódio)
Five diverse Brazilians speak out on surviving prejudice and violence.


Sat 25 / Sun 26 | Something to Remember The unknowable path to self-discovery can take many an unexpected turn, as the young men in these poignant and accomplished short films are soon to discover.

Heavy Weight
A boxer finds his world turned upside down by the arrival of a new fighter at his club.
*Watch Free on #BFIPlayer or YouTube as part of #FiveFilms4Freedom


BFI Flare: London LGBT Film Festival is programmed by Jay Bernard, Michael Blyth, Zorian Clayton, Brian Robinson and Emma Smart, led by Tricia Tuttle, Deputy Head of Festivals and Clare Stewart, BFI Head of Festivals. Image: JampotMedia

 

Film: Fashion Film Festival – Black Girl, 14 Mar 2017

Film: Ousmane Sembène’s, #Black Girl + As Dreams are Made of… (Dir. Peter Colbourne) – Tues 14 March
18:30pm – The Hoxton, Holborn.

Black Girl

Book Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/fashion-in-film-festival-the-black-girl-tickets-32229643732

Racism, colonial oppression and injustice were recurring themes for Senegalese author Ousmane Sembène, who in the 1960s turned from literature to the cinema in order for his social message to reach a broader audience. Mbissine Thérèse Diop plays Diouna, a black nanny to a French family.

The Hoxton, Holborn
199 – 206 High Holborn
London WC1V 7BD

Film: I Am Not Your Negro + Q&A

Film: TNBFC London – I Am Not Your Negro + Q&A with award-winning filmmaker, Raoul Peck. Stratford Picturehouse – Mon 13 March.
 
 
With unprecedented access to James Baldwin’s original work, Raoul Peck has completed the cinematic version of the book Baldwin never wrote – a radical narration about race in America that tracks the lives and assassinations of Baldwin’s friends, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and Medgar Evers.

 

Viceroy’s House

“Viceroy’s House in Delhi was the home of the British rulers of India. After 300 years, that rule was coming to an end. For 6 months in 1947, Lord Mountbatten (played by Hugh Bonneville), assumed the post of the last Viceroy, charged with handing India back to its people.

The film’s story unfolds within that great House. Upstairs lived Mountbatten together with his wife (Gillian Anderson) and daughter (Lily Travers); downstairs lived their 500 Hindu, Muslim and Sikh servants. As the political elite – Nehru, Jinnah and Gandhi – converged on the House to wrangle over the birth of independent India, conflict erupted. A decision was taken to divide the country and create a new Muslim homeland: Pakistan. It was a decision whose consequences reverberate to this day.”


In Cinemas from the 3rd March 2017 – The poster gives nothing away in terms of the emotional impact this film has on the viewer as they watch society torn apart in this film.  The trauma is brilliantly portrayed, and forces the viewer to look beyond the bare facts of partician and straight to the heart of the people who suffered because of it. I ended up sobbing.

Spoiler Alert: With this type of docudrama, I like to scout around (briefly) online to see if I can find the truth – I couldn’t find any references to Churchill’s part in the patrician as described in the film. I did find information which explained some of the looks that Lady Mountbatten gave to Nehru. As always…  “Pinch of Salt” – but neither of these points take away from the effective portrayal of the horrendous devastation to the people.